Tag Archives: Hunger Games

Procrastination Should Be Punishable by Death

guillotine

Off With His Head

Procrastination should be punishable by death. Sound rather drastic doesn’t it? But, hear me out and consider this in a marriage; procrastination can contribute to a slow death of the relationship. Why do we torture each other by putting off things? Refusing to do a simple thing that could be done in 5 minutes.

In my opinion, it causes a petit mort.  The little death, a popular French euphemism for orgasm but in this case the meaning is not so fun. It’s another straw on the camel’s back. I had one of those moments not five minutes ago. I went to Mr. Husband’s office door to tell him that I would like to go see that movie The Hunger Games. Unfortunately I committed the grievous crime of tapping his office door and the door knob bumped against the wall, again. So he grumbled and rolled his eyes. He was pissed off that I might damage his stupid wall. What he may not realize is that his is perilously close to witnessing my foot going through that very same wall or up his a@@. But, now, now, I’m speaking from my anger place.

My response was “will you please get a doorstop or something to fix this &^%#^&*@ door.” OK, I’m not known for my tact or patience, but said door has been without a doorstop since his office was painted over 6 months ago. His response was that he’s going to work out and after that he may or may not do something about the door. Translation (what I heard) = Bug off! I have no intention of ever doing anything about this door because it’s not important to ME. I-don’t-care if it’s important to you.

The Argument

The Argument

What I wanted was a date with the Hubman.  What I got was a kick in the nads. I left his office without the movie date I wanted. Also with hurt feelings, tentative plans to go on walkabout for a year and a half, and a firm resolve to never speak to him or darken his office door again in my natural life.  An overreaction?  Yes, I guess so, but a prime example of how a constant repeated little hurt can fester and turn into a huge, bleeding, gut wrenching hurt.

This is, in theory, a ridiculous reaction to a minor transgression but it is a perfect example of how couples hurt each other by ignoring what is important to the other person but not to them.  Even Alice in Wonderland had this particular relationship problem. Alice was thirsty so the Red Queen gave her a dry biscuit. A classic example of “this is what I’m willing to give, so here take it, and never mind that it’s not what you want or need.” Unsaid is that the person on the receiving end should be glad that they received it, cuz it’s the thought that counts, right? WRONG!!!!!!!  That is only valid when giving a Christmas present to someone you don’t know well. It is not valid in relationships where both participants claim to know and love each other.

All of bazillions of relationship books out tell us that if we aren’t getting what we want it is because we are not asking for what we want, or asking it the right way, or burying a dead cat in the graveyard at midnight while burning purple candles and dancing the nude hoochie coochie. What do you do when you ask over and over, and the person deems your request not only not important enough to grant, but not even important enough to remember? The result being that every time said request is made it’s like it never happened before. Welcome to the marital Twilight Zone from hell.

In a marriage, the old saying “actions speak louder than words” is the lifeblood or the downfall of a loving happy relationship. One partner can tell the other “I love you with all my heart, more than life itself, my love can leap tall mountains in a single bound.” Unfortunately, this degenerates into blather and falls on deaf ears if there are no actions that prove it. If one partner feels like they are on the 2nd page of a very long to do list they feel unloved and unimportant. No matter how many time the other person tells them they are loved and important. You can’t just talk the talk. You gotta walk the walk. Listening to what your partner wants and then taking actions on that specific want is how you walk the walk.

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